Opinion

The Suitable Girl: Sari Fears

October 2, 2018

The women in my family are columns of silk when they wear saris. Statuesque, taller somehow, unattainable in their grace and assuredness, as if they wore the fabric like power. They took small steps but also long strides. They wore high heels that daggered into the floor of hotel ballrooms, leaving behind tiny indentations in … Read More

Arun Welandawe-Prematilleke Brings Queer Truth to Colombo’s Stage

September 24, 2018

The One Who Loves You So, writer and director Arun Welandawe-Prematilleke’s widely-anticipated original play, ran at Colombo’s Namel Malini Punchi theater in August. The play is a complex depiction of a short-lived relationship between two men, one “a wealthy Colombo trust-fund baby” and the other a British expatriate. Their relationship starts with an ordinary match … Read More

Jayisha Patel’s CIRCLE Explores the Repetitive Nature of Violence

September 20, 2018

CIRCLE, a film by Jayisha Patel that premiered last weekend at the Berlin Film Festival, tells the story of a young girl in rural Uttar Pradesh, India, and the physical manifestations of intergenerational trauma. The film follows the story of Khushbu, a survivor of sexual assault, as she recounts her gang-rape at the hands of … Read More

Netflix’s “Sacred Games” Wins at the Expense of Women

August 28, 2018

Netflix’s first Indian original series, Sacred Games, has notably excited our country’s entertainment and art-loving urban youth — a generation that has grown up witnessing idle productions overshadow serialized entertainment. A deluge of media coverage, social media statuses and tweets, and passionate reviews from peers convey awe and admiration. Reviewers chimed that Vikram Chandra’s 2006 novel could … Read More

Transmasculine, Closeted and Dysphoric on Eid al Ahda

August 21, 2018

As a girl and then as a woman, Eid has always been the same. My mother and I rise hours before the other half of our household, brushing, dabbing, smoothing, and painting ourselves before dressing in the clothing she has picked. There are janamaaz laid out on the plastic turf in an Indiana high school … Read More

“If They Come For Us” Plaintively Explores the Legacy of Partition

August 8, 2018

Fatimah Asghar’s much-anticipated debut collection of poetry spans the divide of Partition, community, loss, and love. Motion connotes a certain amount of freedom. It belongs in the air, in the depths of the ocean, in the fingertips of flames reaching for something greater, more infinite. But the movement of Partition relied on boundaries to restrict … Read More

“Marriage of a Thousand Lies” Relishes in the Uncertainty of Love

August 3, 2018

In Marriage of a Thousand Lies, Lucky, the restless romantic, ruminates on queerness and notes that, “most people think the closet is a small room. They think you can touch the wall, touch the door, turn the handle, and walk free. But when you’re inside it, the closet is so vast. No walls, no doors, just empty darkness stretching … Read More

Hindus Must Fight for Justice and Religious Freedom in India

With additional reporting by Sunita Viswanath. On July 26th, U.S. lawmakers, government officials, and NGO leaders attended an event organized by the Hindu American Foundation (HAF) at the nation’s capitol for the release of its new report, “India: Democracy in Diversity.” The report’s release was timed to coincide with a conference organized by the U.S. … Read More

Surina & Mel. Shows Brown Lives in All Their Normalness

July 30, 2018

In a short 55 second trailer, Surina & Mel. shows us what television shows could look like. Even though it’s not out yet, Surina & Mel. from actors Surina Jindal and Melanie Chandra and former Family Guy writer Sameer Gardezi, has us excited. Besides having two South Asian women as the show leads, Surina & Mel. promises to show … Read More

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